February marks Black History Month, a time designated to recognize and honour the accomplishments and contributions of members of the Black community in our society. Throughout the month of February, we will be featuring a number of resources with the purpose of acknowledging, celebrating, and in some cases providing new knowledge.

Our Statement

Over the last year, we have been reminded again of the impact that anti-Black racism and injustice has in our society, not only in the United States, but here in Canada, and more specifically within our individual communities. The ongoing deaths resulting from police actions have brought to the forefront the reality that systemic racism continues to exist and the profound and tragic impact it has on the lives and communities of Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour.

The Western Québec School Board is committed to inclusion, justice, and equity. We understand and acknowledge that there is work to be done within our learning community, as it is fundamentally important to stand together to battle all forms of racism and discrimination. We recognize the experiences of our communities and are committed to listening, responding and supporting our students, families and communities.

Our expectation is that every member of the Western Québec community confronts racism, oppression, injustice, and hate, in a collective effort to not only respect and protect the rights of all our citizens, but also to educate the students moving through our system. To do this we will continue to engage our community partners in providing us with guidance and direction; to provide staff with cultural competence and cultural security training and structure opportunities for voice.

It is only through this collective effort and education that we will move toward a society where no one is subjected to systemic racism and discrimination.

 

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. People learn to hate, and if they learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than the opposite.”
Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela

Learning Resources

Black History Month | Canada.ca
Among other features, it includes a short series of videos about Black History in Canada. From the Canadian Government.

Black Communities in Canada: A Rich History | NFB
The National Film Board has selected a group of films that portray the multi-layered lives of Canada’s diverse Black communities. The incredible stories of strength, courage and perseverance in the face of adversity that these films present are not often found in mainstream history books.

Meet the man who created Black History Month | CTV News
Carter G. Woodson, considered a pioneer in the study of African-American history, is given much of the credit for Black History Month. Curious as to why?

The untold story of ‘Auntie’ Annie Saunders in southern Alberta | Global News
The story of “Auntie” Annie Saunders is one of true grit and independence in the history of southern Alberta.

Learn & Participate: Decade for People of African Descent | United Nations
The UN recognizes that people of African descent represent a distinct group whose human rights must be promoted and protected. Its theme for the International Decade is “People of African descent: recognition, justice and development.”

@CBCBeingBlackInCanada on Instagram | CBC
A window into the celebration and struggles of Canada’s Black community.

The story of Africville | Canadian Museum of Human Rights
Because of racism, Black settlers were pushed to the margins of society and forced to live on the most inhospitable land. Despite this, they persevered, developing strong, vibrant communities. Africville was one such place.

Black History Matters | African Nova Scotian Affairs
Nova Scotia has over 50 historic African Nova Scotian communities with a long, deep, and complex history dating back over 400 years. African Heritage Month provides us with another opportunity to celebrate our culture, legacy, achievements, and contributions of people of African Descent – past and present.

One woman’s resistance, the Viola Desmond story | Canadian Museum of Human Rights
Unaware that a theatre was segregated, the Black Nova Scotian chose a main‐floor seat. When she refused to move to the balcony, where Black patrons were expected to sit, she was arrested and dragged out of the theatre. For many people, the story would have ended there…

Sleeping Car Porters in Canada | The Canadian Encyclopedia
The vast majority of sleeping car porters were Black men and the position was one of only a few job opportunities available to Black men in Canada. While the position carried respect and prestige for Black men in their communities, the work demanded long hours for little pay.


 

Series of webinars for Black History Month | MacEwen University:


 

Videos from Unilearnal’s 28 Moments of Black Canadian History:

Learning Resources

Black History Month | Canada.ca
Among other features, it includes a short series of videos about Black History in Canada. From the Canadian Government.

Black Communities in Canada: A Rich History | NFB
The National Film Board has selected a group of films that portray the multi-layered lives of Canada’s diverse Black communities. The incredible stories of strength, courage and perseverance in the face of adversity that these films present are not often found in mainstream history books.

Meet the man who created Black History Month | CTV News
Carter G. Woodson, considered a pioneer in the study of African-American history, is given much of the credit for Black History Month. Curious as to why?

The untold story of ‘Auntie’ Annie Saunders in southern Alberta | Global News
The story of “Auntie” Annie Saunders is one of true grit and independence in the history of southern Alberta.

Learn & Participate: Decade for People of African Descent | United Nations
The UN recognizes that people of African descent represent a distinct group whose human rights must be promoted and protected. Its theme for the International Decade is “People of African descent: recognition, justice and development.”

@CBCBeingBlackInCanada on Instagram | CBC
A window into the celebration and struggles of Canada’s Black community.

The story of Africville | Canadian Museum of Human Rights
Because of racism, Black settlers were pushed to the margins of society and forced to live on the most inhospitable land. Despite this, they persevered, developing strong, vibrant communities. Africville was one such place.

Black History Matters | African Nova Scotian Affairs
Nova Scotia has over 50 historic African Nova Scotian communities with a long, deep, and complex history dating back over 400 years. African Heritage Month provides us with another opportunity to celebrate our culture, legacy, achievements, and contributions of people of African Descent – past and present.

One woman’s resistance, the Viola Desmond story | Canadian Museum of Human Rights
Unaware that a theatre was segregated, the Black Nova Scotian chose a main‐floor seat. When she refused to move to the balcony, where Black patrons were expected to sit, she was arrested and dragged out of the theatre. For many people, the story would have ended there…

Sleeping Car Porters in Canada | The Canadian Encyclopedia
The vast majority of sleeping car porters were Black men and the position was one of only a few job opportunities available to Black men in Canada. While the position carried respect and prestige for Black men in their communities, the work demanded long hours for little pay.


 

Series of webinars for Black History Month | MacEwen University:


 

Videos from Unilearnal’s 28 Moments of Black Canadian History:

Black Icons

Learn more about each of these Black personalities, and the difference that they made, by clicking or tapping the links under their polaroids.

Media Features

We could choose to forget. Leave what happened in the past… in the past. Never admit that we got it wrong, and that it’s worth making right. But we choose to remember.

Diverse City: Omari and Akilah Newton are taking their 10th annual cross country Black History Month tour, online – and across Canada.

CTV News asked some Black Canadian leaders and artists to offer their perspectives on both celebrating and contending with our country’s own Black history and the path forward in the years to come.