Commitment to Success

The plan, accepted by the ministry of education, lays out the objectives, orientations, indicators and targets for student success for the coming years. It includes the context of the school board, its challenges and priorities.

The School Board is pleased that the Council of Commissioners passed the 2018-2022 Commitment to Success Plan at its September 2018 meeting.

Aligned with the ministry of education strategic plan, the objectives include: increasing the graduation and qualification rates, closing the achievement gap between certain groups of learners (boys, girls, students living in socio-economic disadvantaged areas), ensuring success in elementary schools and safe and secure buildings.

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Background

With the coming into force of Law 105 the Ministry of Education requires school boards to develop a Commitment to Success Plan. The Commitment to Success Plan will include the context of the school board, its educational services, the needs of schools and centres, the challenges it faces and its orientations, objectives, indicators and targets.

Each school board plan must also incorporate five objectives and two broad orientations set by the Ministry of Education. These objectives and orientations are aligned with the Ministry’s 2017-2022 strategic plan as well as the Policy on Educational Success.
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The Goal of the Commitment to Success Plan

The goal of the Western Québec School Board’s Commitment to Success Plan is to share, with all educational personnel, parents and communities, a common vision of our reality and challenges to generate concerted action around the orientations and objectives that impact student learning and success. The plan also provides an opportunity for all to understand the orientations, directions and strategies the school board is undertaking to ensure educational success for all its students.
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Legal Framework

The Commitment to Success Plan must respect the legislative dispositions of the Education Act.

209.1. – For the exercise of its functions and powers, every school board shall establish a commitment to success plan that is consistent with the strategic directions and objectives of the department’s strategic plan. The commitment to success plan must also meet any expectations communicated under section 459.2. In addition, the period covered by the plan must be harmonized with the period covered by the department’s strategic plan in accordance with any terms prescribed under the first paragraph of section 459.3.

This plan, which the school board may update if necessary, must contain:

  1. the context in which the school board acts, particularly the needs of its schools and centres, the main challenges it faces, and the characteristics and expectations of the community it serves;
  2. the directions and objectives selected;
  3. the targets for the period covered by the plan;
  4. the indicators, particularly Québec-wide indicators, to be used to measure achievement of those objectives and targets;
  5. a service statement setting out its objectives with regard to the level and quality of the services it provides;
  6. any other element determined by the Minister.

In preparing its commitment to success plan, the school board shall consult, in particular, the Parents’ committee, the Advisory committee on services for handicapped students and students with social maladjustments or learning disabilities, the Advisory committee on management, the Governing boards, the teachers and other staff members, and the students. The Parents’ committee and Advisory committee on management may, among other things, make recommendations on what should be included in the school board’s commitment to-success plan.

The school board shall send its commitment to success plan to the Minister and make it public on the expiry of 60 to 90 days after sending it or of another period if the school board and the Minister so agree. The commitment to success plan takes effect on the date of its publication. The school board shall present the content of its commitment to success plan to the public at the meeting following the effective date of the plan. Public notice specifying the date, time, and place of the meeting must be given not less than 10 days before it is held.

459.2. – The Minister may determine, for all school boards or based on the situation of one or certain school boards, policy directions, objectives or targets they must take into account in preparing their commitment to success plans.

459.3. – The Minister may, for any school board, prescribe terms governing the coordination of the entire strategic planning process between the educational institutions, the school board, and the department.

The Minister may also, after receiving a school board’s commitment to success plan, require the school board, within the period prescribed by section 209.1, to defer publication of the plan or to amend it to harmonize the period covered by the plan with that covered by the department’s strategic plan in accordance with any terms prescribed under the first paragraph. The Minister may also impose such a requirement to ensure that the plan is consistent with the strategic directions and objectives of the department’s strategic plan; or that it meets the expectations communicated under section 459.2.
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Groups that Collaborated in the Development of the Commitment to Success Plan

The plan was developed by the senior administration with the collaboration of the management advisory group, and the Council of Commissioners. In addition, feedback from the Parent’s committee, the Special Education Advisory committee, school and centre Governing boards was taken into consideration as was that from staff and stakeholders.
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Consultations Held in the Development of the Commitment to Success Plan

The Western Québec School Board undertook a consultation process with its stakeholders in the development of its Commitment to Success Plan. The following consultations were held:

Management Advisory Group March 29, 2018
Parents’ Committee April 16, 2018
Special Education Advisory Committee April 9, 2018
School and Centre Governing Boards April, 2018
WQSB Staff and Students April, 2018 (Via Online Survey)
Community Members April, 2018 (Via Online Survey)

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Western Québec School Board Context

The Western Québec School Board comprises 25 schools and five adult education and vocational training centres across two administrative regions, 07 and 08. The board’s territory is large, covering more than 90,000 square kilometres and spread over 155 municipalities. Schools and centres are located throughout this territory with the largest located in the urban tract of Gatineau. The sheer size of our territory and the dispersion of the English-speaking population within that territory have required an organization of schools and centres to meet this challenge and ensure access to our clientele.

The school configuration is as follows: 13 elementary schools, 2 Junior high schools (secondary I and II), 2 secondary schools (secondary I to V), 2 senior secondary schools (secondary III to V), 1 kindergarten to secondary II school and 5 kindergartens to secondary V schools. WQSB operates three joint adult general education and vocational training centres, one adult general education centre and one vocational training centre.
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Schools and Centres 
Elementary Schools
School Location Population (as of Sept 30, 2017)
Buckingham Elementary School Buckingham 144
Greater Gatineau Elementary School Gatineau (Gatineau sector) 469
Pierre Elliott Trudeau Elementary School Gatineau (Hull Sector) 569
Chelsea Elementary School Chelsea 281
South Hull Elementary School Gatineau (Aylmer sector) 449
Lord Aylmer Elementary School Gatineau (Aylmer sector) 659
Eardley Elementary School Gatineau (Aylmer sector) 360
Onslow Elementary School Onslow 72
Dr. S.E. McDowell Elementary School Shawville 275
St. John’s Elementary School (has a full-time k4) Campbell’s Bay 114
Queen Elizabeth Elementary School (has a full-time k4) Kazabazua 74
Wakefield Elementary School Wakefield (La Pêche) 306
Poltimore Elementary School Poltimore 41

 

Secondary Schools
School Location Population
St. Michael’s High School Low 100
Hadley Junior High School Gatineau (Hull sector) 459
Philemon Wright High School Gatineau (Hull sector) 612
Symmes Junior High School Gatineau (Aylmer sector) 437
D’Arcy McGee High School Gatineau (Aylmer sector) 586
Pontiac High School Shawville 382

 

Kindergarten to Grade 11 Schools (K-11) 
School Location Population
Dr. Wilbert Keon School (has a full-time k4) Chapeau 158
G. Theberge School Témiscaming 106
Noranda School Noranda 82
Golden Valley School Val d’Or 244
Maniwaki Woodland School (has a full-time k4) Maniwaki 208
Namur School (k-8) (has a full-time k4) Namur 104

 

Adult Education and Vocational Training Centres
School Location Population (Population varies over the year)
Hull Adult Education Centre Gatineau (Hull sector) Approximately 600
Western Québec Career Centre Gatineau (Aylmer sector) Approximately 225
Pontiac Continuing Education Centre Shawville Approximately 150
Val d’Or Adult Education Centre Val d’Or Approximately 35
Maniwaki Adult Education and Vocational Training Centre Maniwaki Approximately 45

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Programs and Services

Programs and services offered by the Western Québec School Board include four-year old kindergarten programs in socio-economic disadvantaged areas, enriched French academic programs, adult general education, vocational training, transition and induction programs, Work Oriented Training programs (WOTP), life skills programs, along with pre-kindergarten and daycare services. WQSB offers a wide range of extra-curricular opportunities in sports, cultural, character building, and community-oriented activities along with a variety of student-centred services offered in our schools and centres.
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Community Learning Centres

The Western Québec School Board has five Community Learning Centres (CLC) that are integral to the following schools: St. Michael’s High School, St. John’s Elementary School, Val d’Or Adult Education Centre, Pierre Elliott Trudeau Elementary School, and Maniwaki Woodland School. Each CLC has a community development agent whose role is to facilitate community partnerships, service-based learning and contribute and enrich student life. Funding for the CLCs is provided through the Entente Canada-Québec.
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Framework for Success – Four Directions

In order to ensure student success Western Québec is building a framework for success to ensure its schools and centres are viable, sustainable, and provide the same quality of opportunity for all.  At the same time, Western Québec is committed to increasing graduation and qualification rates in all sectors and closing the achievement gap (reducing the disparity between the performance of groups of students) for all students.

Our core purpose has been articulated by the Minister of Education in the Policy on Educational Success.  In it he states “the government is working to ensure that everyone can achieve their full potential.”  He goes on to say that “success means providing everyone with the opportunity to display their talents at any stage of life.”

The Western Québec School Board is engaged and determined to realize the Minister’s stated objectives. Each of our four strategic directions and system alignment goals are focused to ensure that all of our decisions are based on individual student achievement.
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Our directions

Safety and Security

To provide a healthy and safe environment for students and staff to maximize student achievement.

Professional Responsibility – Management and Accountability

To maximize the use of all resources to support teaching and learning.

Focus on Pedagogy to Improve Teaching and Learning

To continually improve the quality of instructions so that students have the best possible opportunities to learn and achieve to their potential.

Professional Learning, Feedback, and Growth

To ensure that all employees have on-going opportunities to improve so that students’ educational experience continues to improve year after year.

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Alignment

While not a strategic direction in itself, WQSB strives to ensure that all improvement plans, resources and communications are aligned to MEES directions and WQSB goals.

It is through these strategic directions and the organization and delivery of services centred on a knowledge management system that Western Québec has set its objectives, strategies and actions.
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Challenges

The following realities, while not all directly influential on student achievement, impact the board’s ability to make the most efficient and effective use of its resources. The overarching issues that continue to confront the WQSB include distance and dispersion (impacts the organization of schools and centres to ensure accessibility), a high mobility rate (impacts retention and success of students and skews statistics from MEES), socio-economic factors (impacts student achievement), recruitment and retention of qualified teaching staff in our rural schools and centres (impacts the quality of teaching and learning).
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Demographics

In the last two years the Western Québec School Board demographics have shifted to an upward trend moving enrollment from 6910 in 2015-2016 to 7298 in 2017-2018. This increase, however, is concentrated in the urban tract of Gatineau as our rural, outlying areas continue to see a decline (the exception being Maniwaki Woodland, Queen Elizabeth, St. Michael’s and Dr. S.E. McDowell).

Demographic projections indicate that Western Québec’s student population will increase from 2018-2019 to 2022-2024.  Again, this holds primarily for our urban schools and less so for our rural and northern schools where we expect to see continuing decline. Student population decline in our rural and norther areas can be attributed to several factors including aging populations, and mobility out of the areas due in part to limited employment opportunities. The decline in our rural and northern schools poses a serious challenge to the delivery of education. As it is now, several of our rural and northern kindergarten to secondary V schools struggle to deliver the Basic School Regulation (BSR) offerings to students. Four of these schools have fewer than 80 students at the secondary level. In all cases additional staffing is assigned to ensure the continued delivery of quality teaching and learning.

The growth in our urban area (primarily the Gatineau corridor) has created its own set of challenges, specifically overcrowding in some schools. This has required a change in the use of space to accommodate the student numbers (library and cafeteria space converted into classrooms).

Due to the nature of the offering (variable entry and exit) it is difficult to track demographic changes in Adult Education and Vocational Training but in general there has been a decline in rural centres and stability in urban centres. The decline in the rural centres makes it challenging to offer viable programs, especially vocational training. In order to continue to provide English-language adult and vocational training, resource allocation must be adjusted to accommodate smaller numbers.

Projected youth sector enrollment for WQSB

Data from Ministère de l’éducation et de l’enseignement supérieur (MEES): Line 1 – Kindergarten enrollment; Line 2 – Elementary enrollment; Line 3 – Secondary enrollment

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Socio-economic

Western Québec has a significant portion (15 of 25) of its schools that are 8, 9 or 10 on the Ministère de l’éducation et de l’enseignement supérieur (MEES) Indice de milieu socio-économique scale. Schools are classified on a range of 1 to 10, with 1 being considered the least socio-economically disadvantaged and 10 being the most socio-economically disadvantaged. Several factors contribute to the classification including family income and mother’s level of education.  These schools are designated as New Approaches New Solutions (NANS) schools and they focus on specific orientations to contribute to student success. These include five kindergartens to secondary V schools ranked 8, 9 or 10 and three elementary schools ranked 8, 9 or 10, and one secondary school ranked 8, 9 or 10. In addition, three more schools are designated as a 7. While the MEES does not designate Adult Education centres on the socio-economic ranking scale, it is important to note that 3 of the centres are located in the same geographic areas as schools ranked as 8, 9 or 10.  A significant portion of the population of learners in these centres are not in employment nor do they possess an initial diploma.

Schools ranked 8, 9 or 10 benefit from the New Approaches, New Solutions (NANS) measure provided by the Ministry to increase student success. In addition, NANS schools now benefit from additional resources to provide support in early literacy and numeracy, support for students with special needs, and additional support in academic subjects at the high school level. Our NANS schools have made significant progress in student achievement. Although many of the cohorts are small, results on the MEES and board objectives in our NANS schools continue to show improvement. This is evident in the success on the uniform exams at secondary IV and V levels. There is also progress, although slower, in the core subjects of French Second Language (FSL), English Language Arts (ELA), and Math at the elementary level.  At the board level, we have focused on providing additional support in the core subject areas as well as programs targeted to improve the quality of teaching and learning. At the school level, schools have developed and embedded strategies that focus on both prevention and intervention for identified groups of students.

Note: Poltimore School does not appear on the chart as its population is too small. However, it is a socio-economic ranking of 10 and is included in the New Approaches New Solutions orientations.

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Indigenous Learner Success

The Western Québec School Board has a significant Indigenous student population (approximately 15%). Much of the Western Québec School Board is on un-ceded Algonquin land and there are 10 Indigenous communities in the region in which Western Québec provides educational services through its schools and centres. Several Western Québec schools have significant First Nation, Metis, and Inuit student populations. These are:

  • Maniwaki Woodland, Maniwaki (68%)
  • Golden Valley, Val d’Or (55%)
  • Theberge, Temiscaming (52%)
  • Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Gatineau (16%)
  • South Hull, Gatineau (12 %)
  • Hadley/Philemon Wright High School, Gatineau (5 %)
  • Symmes/D’Arcy McGee High School, Gatineau (7%)
  • Val d’Or Adult Education Centre, Val d’Or (80%)
  • Maniwaki Adult Education Centre, Maniwaki (85%)

Note: Percentages are approximate as they can vary from year to year. In addition, in the adult education centres, entry is on-going so numbers can shift weekly.

Canadian and Québec educational statistics indicate a significant gap in the success rates of Indigenous learners in comparison to non-indigenous learners. This is an area of focus for the board and Western Québec continues to develop and deliver a culturally relevant curriculum and an Indigenous pedagogy approach where possible. The board has engaged several community members and elders to work in developing resources, provide staff training, and support to students. In addition, Western Québec has established key partnerships with Native Friendship Centres in both Val d’Or and Maniwaki and works closely with several Indigenous community partners. WQSB adopted several strategies to ensure adequate support for Indigenous students. These include a centralized approach for use of the MEES Aboriginal success grant in our schools and centres with Indigenous students. The board supports the receiving schools through a network and research-based professional development for staff. The focus of additional assistance is language of instruction, French second language, certifying subjects in secondary, engagement and retention.
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Students with Special Needs

The population of students with special needs in Western Québec Schools has increased in the last few years.  Since 2015 the number of students designated Éleves handicapé ou en dificulté d’adaptation ou d’apprentissage (EHDAA) has increased from 432 to 466 in 2017-2018. The Éleves en difficulté d’adaptation ou d’apprentissage (EDAA) population has increased by 81 students in the same period. All students with special needs are integrated into regular classrooms in Western Québec with the exception of three specialized board-run classes: Chelsea Centre (Chelsea Elementary), Transitions Centre (Eardley Elementary), and Lindsay Place (Hadley Junior High and Philemon Wright High School). The size of our territory is a specific challenge for the organization of services for students with special needs creating inequitable access to direct services from professionals (Speech Language and Psychology for example). In addition, recruiting and retaining qualified special education staff, whether they be teachers, technicians or attendants to the handicapped is sometimes difficult in our rural and northern schools. A lack of services and or bilingual staff in the helping agencies (social services and health care) in many of our communities compounds the situation further. Our adult education and vocational training centres also have a number of students with special needs and more and more support is required to ensure success.

School year Total population EDAA EHDAA Total IEPs % with IEPs
13-14 6653 1347 (20.2%) 368 (5.53%) 1715 25.8%
14-15 6679 1425 (21.3%) 390 (5.84%) 1815 27.2%
15-16 6910 1468 (21.2%) 432 (6.25%) 1900 27.5%
16-17 7134 1563 (21.9%) 453 (6.35%) 2016 28.3%
17-18 7244 1549 (21.4%) 466 (6.43%) 2015 27.8%

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Recruitment and Retention of Staff

The Western Québec School Board employs more than 1,000 people in several categories of employment, most of them working directly with students. Recruiting and retaining qualified personnel in rural areas remains a challenging reality, notably in the teaching and professional fields. The challenge we have in recruiting and retaining qualified teaching staff is generally across all subjects but is even more evident in specialized areas such as French, Math, Science and Special Education. The proximity to the Ontario employment market also impacts our ability to recruit and retain staff.
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High Mobility Rates

Many Western Québec School Board schools border the province of Ontario. People often move back and forth between the two provinces in search of the best living conditions. This trend results in a high mobility rate for our student population. Consequently, the school board’s dropout rate is inflated because some high school students move out of the province prior to receiving a Québec high school diploma or certification.

The Ministry of Education views a drop out in Québec as any student who leaves the system without a qualification or diploma in a given year and whose permanent code does not reappear in the following year. This includes anyone from secondary 1 to 5 who has left the province, returned to an Indigenous band controlled school or died. In a 2011 study of its drop outs, the WQSB demonstrated that the statistics generated by the ministry do not accurately reflect the migration rate of families to Ontario and elsewhere. For example, between 2005 and 2008 the study found that the migration rate for its families was 5 to 8 times higher than the 2.6% put forth by the ministry.

The Western Québec School Board continues to challenge the Ministry of Education statistics on school leavers without qualifications or certifications. The school board tracks all leavers on an annual basis through it’s SARCA services. Each student leaver is identified as either a mover within the province, a mover outside of the province or a student who has made the decision to “quit”. As a board we have made the decision to focus on working to bring the students who have quit back into the system. However, we will be tracking the 2016 Secondary 1 cohort of students in an effort to produce a truer portrait of our leavers without diploma as well as a more accurate graduation and qualification statistic.
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Ministry Objectives

The MEES objectives and intended outcomes focus on the following areas:

  • Graduation and Qualifications
  • Equity – reducing the achievement gap between groups
  • Language Proficiency – increase proficiency on grade 4
  • Educational Path – reduce delay on entry to high school
  • Living Environment – all schools in good condition

The table below outlines the MEES objectives, targets and indicators.

MEES Objective – 2030 Alignment with Policy on Educational Success Intermediary Target – 2022 Actual Situation Indicator
Increase to 90 % the proportion of students under the age of 20 who obtain a first diploma or qualification, and to 85% the proportion of these students who obtain a first diploma (Secondary School Diploma or Diploma of Vocational Studies) Objective 1 Increase to 84% the proportion of students under the age of 20 who obtain a first diploma or qualification 78.8% *2008-2009 cohort Graduation and Qualification rate after 7 years
Reduce the achievement gap between certain groups of students Objective 2 Boys and girls: reduce the gap to 6.1 % (public and private)

EDHAA and regular students: reduce the gap to 25.3% (public only)

Socio-economically disadvantaged schools: Reduce the gap to 6.5% (public only)

First generation immigrant students: Reduce the gap to 3 % (public and private)

Boys and girls: a gap of 10.1 % (public and private)

EDHAA and regular: a gap of 34.1% (public only)

Socio-economically disadvantaged schools:

A gap of 8.9% (public only)

First generation immigrant students: a gap of 4.1 % (public and private)

*2008-2009 cohort

Graduation and Qualification rate after 7 years of secondary school
Reduce to 10 % the proportion of students entering secondary school at age 13 or older Objective 6 Bring the proportion of students entering secondary school at 13 years old or older to 11.4% 12.6%

*2016-2017 cohort

The proportion of students age 13 or older at entry to secondary school
90% success rate on the writing component of Ministry Grade 4 language of instruction exam, public sector Objective 4 School Boards must determine an intermediary target based on an analysis of the 2017 exam Not Available Success rate on the writing component of the Grade 4 Ministry exam
All school buildings in a satisfactory state Objective 7 Raise the percentage of buildings in a satisfactory state to 85% 68 % of buildings are in a satisfactory state Indice d’état des bâtiments du parc immobilier

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Western Québec Data and Targets for MEES Objectives

The table below outlines the Ministry objectives, the WQSB school board data and targets.

MEES Objective – 2030 WQSB Actual Situation Target – 2022 Indicator Core Areas of Focus
  2008 cohort 2009 cohort      
Increase to 90 % the proportion of students under the age of 20 who obtain a first diploma or qualification, and to 85% the proportion of these students who obtain a first diploma (Secondary School Diploma or Diploma of Vocational Studies) 74.3% 75.5% 82 % Graduation and Qualification rate after 7 years of secondary school Early Literacy and Numeracy

Focused support for students with special needs

Core subjects of English, math and French through elementary to secondary

Reduce the achievement gap between certain groups of students · Boys: 71.1%

· Girls: 77.9%

· EDHAA: 53.2%

· Regular students: 83%
Socio-economically disadvantaged schools:

· Ranking 1, 2, 3: 78.3%

· Ranking 4,5,6,7: 74.8%

· Ranking 8,9,10: 66%
Immigrant students:

· First generation: 50%

· Second generation: 84.1%

· Boys: 78.1%

· Girls: 72.8%

· EDHAA: 53.6%

· Regular students: 85.7%
Socio-economically disadvantaged schools:

· Ranking 1,2,3: 80%

· Ranking 4,5,6,7: 76.8%

· Ranking 8,9,10: 67.2%
Immigrant students:

· First generation: 52.9%

· Second generation: 83.7%

Reduce the gap between boys and girls by 5%

Reduce the gap between EDHAA and regular students by 7 %

Reduce the gap between the 8, 9 and 10 schools and the 1, 2, 3 schools to 10 %

Given the very small numbers of first generation immigrant students (Bill 101 restrictions), the board will not be setting a target

Graduation and Qualification rate after 7 years of secondary school Early Literacy and Numeracy

Focused support for students with special needs

Support at secondary for student aspirations and retention

  2015-2016 2016-2017      
Reduce to 10 % the proportion of students entering secondary school at age 13 or older 13.3% 9.8% Reduce the proportion of students entering secondary schools at age 13 or older to 8.8% The proportion of students age 13 or older at entry to secondary school Early identification to ensure support for learning

Support in place

Quality Professional Development

90% success rate on the writing component of Ministry Grade 4 language of instruction exam, public sector At this time there is no MEES grade 4 exam in language of instruction.

WQSB will set a target on the writing component of the Grade 6 exam

85% of students will be successful on the writing component of the Grade 6 English language arts exam Success rate on the writing component of the Grade 6 Ministry exam Early literacy intervention

Marking Centres to align practices

Formative assessment

All school buildings in a satisfactory state 17 % of buildings are in good condition Increase the percentage of buildings in good condition to 83% Indice d’état des bâtiments du parc immobilier Plan of action based on established priorities

Comprehensive analysis of state of buildings

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Western Québec Objectives, Targets and Indicators

In addition to the MEES objectives, the Western Québec School Board has chosen to set objectives in the following areas: success at end of elementary cycles in core subjects of English, Math and French; success on MEES uniform exams in secondary 4 and 5; proportion of students registered in secondary 5 on September 30 of a given year who obtain a diploma in June of the same year.

WQSB Objective Actual Situation Target – 2022 Indicator Core Areas of Focus
Increase success rate in Cycle 2 Elementary English Benchmark to be established June 2018 90% Overall success and proficiency in subject Early Literacy

Support for students with special needs

Quality of teaching and learning

Quality professional development

Increase success rate in Cycle 2 Elementary Math Benchmark to be established June 2018 90% Overall success and proficiency in subject Numeracy

Support for students with special needs

Quality of teaching and learning

Quality professional development

Increase success rate in Cycle 2 Elementary French second Language Benchmark to be established June 2018 90% Overall success and proficiency in subject Second language literacy

Support for students with special needs

Quality of teaching and learning

Quality professional development

Increase success rate on Cycle 3 Elementary English exam 88% 90% Overall success and proficiency in subject Literacy support

Support for students with special needs

Quality of teaching and learning

Quality professional development

Increase success rate in Cycle 3 Elementary Math exam 66% 85% Overall success and proficiency in subject Numeracy support

Support for students with special needs

Quality of teaching and learning

Quality professional development

Increase success rate in Cycle 3 Elementary French second Language exam 80% 90% Overall success and proficiency in subject Second language literacy

Support for students with special needs

Quality of teaching and learning

Quality professional development

Increase success rate on Secondary 4 History and Citizenship Uniform Exam 67.2% 80 % Success rate on Secondary 4 History and Citizenship Uniform Exam Quality teaching and learning

Quality Professional development

Sharing of effective practices/resources

Increase success rate in Secondary 4 Math Uniform Exam CST – 71.1%

Science – 66.7%

80 %

85%

Success rate in Secondary 4 Math Uniform Exam Quality teaching and learning

Quality Professional development

Sharing of effective practices/resources

Increase success rate in Secondary 4 Science Uniform Exam Applied – 79.1%

General – 76.9%

85%

85%

Success rate in Secondary 4 Science Uniform Exam Quality teaching and learning

Quality Professional development

Sharing of effective practices/resources

Increase success rate on Secondary 5 English Language Arts Uniform Exam Production – 95%

Reading –  89.7%

95%

95%

Success rate on Secondary 5 English Language Arts Uniform Exam Quality teaching and learning

Quality Professional development

Sharing of effective practices/resources

Increase proficiency on Secondary 5 English Language Arts exam (average nark) Production – 74.3%

Reading – 72%

78 %

75%

Proficiency on English Language Arts Exam Quality teaching and learning

Quality Professional development

Sharing of effective practices/resources

 

Increase success rate in Secondary 5 French Second Language Uniform Exam Production -74%

Comprehension – 72.2%

Interaction – 94.3%

80%

 

78%

96%

Success rate in Secondary 5 French Second Language Uniform Quality teaching and learning

Quality Professional development

Sharing of effective practices/resources

Increase the rate of Secondary 5 students registered on September 30 who obtain a Secondary Studies Diploma 88 % 95% The rate of Secondary 5 students registered on September 30 who obtain a Secondary Studies Diploma Quality teaching and learning

Quality Professional development

Sharing of effective practices/resources

Increase the rate of vocational training students who obtain a Vocational Studies Diploma Benchmark will be determined using 2016-2018 period 80% Success rate of students obtaining Vocational Studies Diploma (by program) Quality teaching and learning

Quality Professional development

Sharing of effective practices/resources

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MEES Orientations

The Western Québec School Board is also responsible for addressing the following two orientations.

Orientation Board Actions Board Actions Board Actions
Contribute to the number of adults with high level literacy skills based on the 2022 PIACC assessment. In the last PIACC 47% of adults had high level literacy skills. Recruitment campaign to reach hard to reach adults with low level literacy Partnerships with community organizations and Friendship Centres Develop and implement a project to promote and improve parent literacy levels in our socio-economically disadvantaged areas.
Ensure elementary students get 60 minutes a day of activity (including Physical education) Schools participating in Ça bouge en cube measures Outdoor education and environmental awareness program Resource bank of organized recess activities that promote movement

 

To ensure the successful implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the commitment to success plan, the Western Québec School Board will develop action plans and provide support for both the MEES mandated objectives and the board objectives. Progress on the plan will be communicated to the system and stakeholders in the annual report.
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School Board Declaration Regarding the Level and Quality of Services Offered

The Western Québec School Board provides educational programming to learners from the age of four to eighty! Our services include 4-year-old kindergartens in approved socio-economic disadvantaged schools, passe-partout and regular 5-year-old kindergartens as well as elementary and secondary education. Our Adult Education and Vocational Training Centres offer adult general education leading to secondary studies diplomas, pre-requisites for further education and ministry authorized vocational training programs. Western Québec also provides reference, referral and support, and counselling services to adults in its regions as well as customized training and business services.

The Western Québec School Board is committed to student success by providing quality of opportunity to all and an equitable distribution of resources. Our framework for success, the four directions, reinforces our core purpose and commitment to all students achieving full potential. Each of our four strategic directions and system alignment goals are focused to ensure that all of our decisions are based on individual student achievement. As such, the Western Québec School Board declares the following:

  • The Western Québec School Board is a knowledge-managed organization committed to individual student achievement and each student achieving to full potential.
  • The Western Québec School Board provides a safe and secure learning environment for students and staff.
  • The Western Québec School Board is committed to the highest quality of teaching and learning.
  • The Western Québec School Board is committed to providing all its students access to services that support learning success.
  • The Western Québec School Board cultivates staff learning and growth in a culture of best practices.
  • The Western Québec School Board has a formal complaints and resolution process.

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Complaints Procedure

By-law 18, which establishes procedures for the examination of complaints, can be found on this page.

Western Québec School Board
15 Katimavik, Gatineau, QC J9J 0E9
819 684 2336 / 1 800 363 9111
Operating hours: Monday to Friday, 8:30 to 4:30